Thursday, January 28, 2016

Speak Your Mind! Daily Discussion Forum

Podcast

The above link is a link to a podcast that discusses Invisible Man – more importantly, it also discusses the narrator’s identity crisis, and reflects on how the people around him impose their own identities and beliefs upon him, making it difficult for him to conform to any one standard. Such an idea is, once again, applicable to Lacan’s mirror stage: the narrator is impressed with so many outside influences that he cannot disregard their beliefs in favor of his own.
One such outside influence is the Brotherhood – the narrator sees with them an opportunity to finally be “visible” and gain a true identity, yet his attempts are flawed once more. His passion for the Brotherhood’s beliefs is somewhat similar to his passion for the Founder’s philosophy earlier on in the book: he was fully committed to them both, yet one has to wonder if he became committed and devoted not because he truly believed in the ideas, but rather because it was a mode of acceptance and an easy way for him to gain a more coherent sense of self.
Listen to the podcast and consider the following questions.  What are your opinions? How is his passion for the beliefs of the Brotherhood any different than his passion for the beliefs of the Founder? What makes them more genuine/less genuine?
Post your response before class time tomorrow.  Also respond to at least one classmate's post.  Please try to stretch their comments as much as you praise them.  Do not be afraid to question, reference the text, or respectfully challenge.

20 comments:

  1. The invisible man is searching for his identity throughout the entire book and is passionate when a chance to identify himself arises. In terms of the founders, he accepts them and their principles, in the hopes of gaining status and a admirable identity from them. The Brotherhood is much the same. The narrator sees the opportunity to make something of himself and jumps at the chance. I would say the passion for the Brotherhood stems from that desire of self discovery more than the "passion" the invisible man had for the founders. This can be equated with saying his motives were more genuine because he took a step and away conforming to the founders views to actually working towards creating himself.

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    1. I agree with your claim on the passion the narrator held towards the brotherhood, but what do you think the "passion" for the founders was? Did the narrator posses any passion towards them or were they just an idea to cling onto in hopes for acceptance?

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  2. His passion for the beliefs of the Brotherhood was more intense than his passion for the beliefs of the Founder. When talking with the Founder, the narrator was more focused on not upsetting him and sticking with the status quo. When with the Brotherhood, the narrator felt more passionate about his speeches that he was giving. He wanted the black people to unite and had stronger ideas in his speeches. He is more genuine about the Brotherhood because he is always trying to do what is best for the black people, for example he stood up for the people who were getting evicted. When he was with the Founder it seemed less genuine because seemed only like he was more concerned about not making any mistakes and trying to please the Founder.

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    1. I agree on your claim of the Narrator being more passionate for the Brotherhood, but I have a question. Do you think that The Narrator's passion in the Brotherhood was to please the blacks or create himself?

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    2. Good question, Lauren. What do you think?

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  3. I believe that the narrator had a stronger passion for the brotherhood, while the narrator was with Mr. Norton he was always trying to fit into the status quo; he always seemed to be worrying about his actions and what society would think about them. When he was in the car with Mr. Norton his thoughts were taken over with worry trying to make sure he pleased the founder and showed Mr. Norton exactly what he wanted to see. He tried so hard to fit in, but in the brotherhood he fit in without even thinking about it. Almost every time he gave a speech with the brotherhood he drew inspiration from some random act he had seen and gave a powerful speech even if it was not his intentions. He did not think about his own actions, he thought of others and how they had been wronged to gain inspiration, and ended up giving passionate speeches trying to rally the people together. What makes his passion for the brotherhood more genuine was he did it without thinking, he was not worried about the consequences of what he was saying when he gave the speeches.

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    1. In your opinion do you think that the narrator tries to please the founder out of fear or admiration?

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    2. Yes I agree he fit in with the Brotherhood because he didn't have to fake anything or settle for the status quo. Do you think in the Brotherhood there were members who were just settling for the status quo and other members who passionately fought for what they believed in?

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  4. The narrator is trying to create and find his true self throughout the book. He strives to make the founders recognize him and his achievements and find a place in their world, whereas in the Brotherhood, he has a place. In the Brotherhood, the narrator longs for a way to make a name for himself, as he does when he becomes a main voice of the group. I believe that the Brotherhood was more genuine due to the fact that he did have a place there and felt as if it were helping him find himself. His passion came from the realization that he may have a place to belong in the world, and that he has a purpose to fulfill.

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    1. I agree that the narrator had passion for the brotherhood in the beginning, but do you think some of his passion died when he learned that the brotherhood was using him to help themselves?

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    2. I agree that in the Brotherhood the narrator longs for a way to make a name for himself, but do you think that the Brotherhood ever helped the narrator find himself?

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  5. I think that the narrator has more genuine passion for the brotherhood. He is praised by one of the leaders of the brotherhood, and finally feels in a place where he belongs. I feel like he is just tiptoeing around when he is around the founder careful not to say anything that will cause anger. When he speaks for the brotherhood he says anything and everything that comes to his mind.

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    1. Very true, Colton. The narrator speaks freely until they make it clear that he was not brought in to think. Do you think of the narrator sees himself through the brotherhood, because of them, or as a result of their rejection?

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  6. I believe the passion the narrator had for the brotherhood was stronger and more genuine than it was for the founders. While with the founders he is trying to conform to the beliefs they hold and worried he will make the wrong move and upset them, whereas the brotherhood is a place where the narrator believes he already has a place and isn't trying to filter his thoughts and create himself. he is letting true passion drive his speeches while in the brotherhood letting go of the pressure of finding his place in society that he held with the founders.

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    1. I agree with your comment completely. I have a question though about him fitting in to the Brotherhood. Do you think that the Brotherhood actually represented his true identity or it more represented the identity of who he thought he wanted to be and that was why he didnt feel the pressure to stick to the status quo like he did with the founders?

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  7. I think that the narrator is more passionate about the Brotherhood than the Founders. When he was with the Founders he was more worried about impressing them and not making any mistakes, but when he was with the Brotherhood he seemed to actually care about what was going on and he seemed to think he fit in better and didnt have to worry so much about making mistakes. For instance when he stood up for the people being evicted, he was very passionate about his beliefs and was doing the opposite of what member of the Brotherhood wanted. I believe that if this scene had happened with the Founders he wouldnt have reacted the same way.

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    1. I agree with your idea of him being more passionate with the Brotherhood, why do you believe he was more nervous with the Founders rather then the Brotherhood? What made him more comfortable in one group compared to the other?

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  8. It seems that when our narrator joins the Brotherhood he has a sense of place and identity. One place where he could speak his mind, show his beliefs and feelings with impunity, unlike any other place he had been to. This becomes his world, he actively follows everything going on in the Brotherhood up until the point of his betrayal which would of devastated him. The Brotherhood was his one shot at identity and placement and it was snatched out of his fingers.

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  9. The narrator was more concerned with the Brotherhood rather than the Founders. He seemed to be more involved and enjoyed the brotherhood more than the Founders. He's more genuine because in his speeches he gives, he is more involved and passionate about what he is saying He seems to actually believe more in his cause for the brotherhood rather than the Founders. He seems to believe that he can discover himself more in the Brotherhood than the Founders because it's like he belongs more in the brotherhood rather than the founders. He had a chance to discover himself in the brotherhood but he ended up not getting that chance.

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